Workplace Violence and Harassment Training and Consulting

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Preventing Workplace Violence and Harassment

 On June 15, 2010, the provincial government passed Bill 168 . Bill 168 amends the Occupational Health and Safety Act to address issues of workplace harassment and violence. Employers are now required to develop written policies with respect to both workplace violence and workplace harassment and must review those policies at least once per year. Employers must also develop and maintain programs to implement the policies and to deal with incidents and complaints of workplace violence and harassment.

An employer must assess the risks of workplace violence that may arise from the nature of the workplace, the type of work or the conditions of work. The program developed to implement the workplace violence policy must include measures and procedures to control the risks identified in the assessment that are likely to expose a worker to physical injury. It must also set out how the employer will investigate and deal with incidents or complaints of workplace violence. Additionally, if an employer becomes aware that domestic violence  may occur in the workplace, the employer must take every reasonable precaution to protect the worker.

 In particular, an employer’s duty under section 25(2)(a) of the Occupational Health and Safety Act to provide information to a worker to protect the health or safety of the worker, and a supervisor’s duty under section 27(2)(a) of the Act to advise a worker of the existence of any potential or actual danger to the health or safety of the worker of which the supervisor is aware, include a duty to provide information, including personal information, related to a risk of workplace violence from a person with a history of violent behaviour if the worker can be expected to encounter that person in the course of his/her work and the risk of workplace violence is likely to expose the worker to physical injury.

 Bill 168 also amends the work refusal section of the Act to give workers a right to refuse to work if workplace violence is likely to endanger the worker. The Bill sets out rules governing the investigation of such work refusals. With respect to workplace harassment, the program an employer must develop and maintain to implement its workplace harassment policy must include measures and procedures for workers to report incidents of workplace harassment to the employer or a supervisor. It must also set out how the employer will investigate and deal with incidents and complaints of workplace harassment.

All Ontario employers must take steps to ensure they are in compliance in order to prevent these type of incidents and before that Ministry of Labour Inspector comes knocking at their door!

We conduct Workplace Violence and Harassment Consulting and Training in Vaughan at our training centre and surrounding areas.

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